Top 5 Tuesday: Top 5 Series I Need to Finish

I have a very, very, very bad habit of not completing series in a timely manner. I’m sure many of you can relate to that. Thing is, I tend to have years in between books.

I have a lot of series, in various stages of completion, on my shelves. Often times, I buy the first book and then don’t read it until the series is finished. Most, however, have been gathering dust for longer than they should have. These are the ones where I really loved the first book, bought the second one almost immediately after, and then proceeded to not keep up with each release.

Most of the books here are on my list for books I want (need) to read before the end of the year. Then, I jinx myself by not doing exactly that.

Right now, the series I currently need to finish are:

 

The Dark Artifices trilogy by Cassandra Clare

I read and loved Lady Midnight in 2017. When I read it, Lord of Shadows came out shortly thereafter. Then, of course, I didn’t read it. Now, Queen of Air and Darkness is out in the world and in my possession. I actually think The Dark Artifices could be my new favorite Shadowhunters series, neck and neck with The Infernal Devices trilogy. Thing is, Cassandra Clare’s books are massive and her chapters too long. Even if I wasn’t in graduate school, her books take a lot of energy for me to get through.

 

Throne of Glass series by Sarah J. Maas

I have the same problem with Sarah J. Maas’s books as I do with Cassandra Clare’s. While I enjoy them overall, the books can be hard to get through due to their length. Also, part of the reason I sometimes put off Sarah J. Maas new releases is that she has a tendency to butcher characters for the sake of making another one look good. But with the Throne of Glass series, I made it this far (surviving Empire of Smut) that I cannot avoid seeing through the last two books.

 

The Conqueror’s Saga by Kiersten White

I read And I Darken, the first book in the trilogy, two ago from the library. Then, I bought my own copy, and then the other two books, Now I Rise and Bright We Burn when I could. Unlike most people, I really liked And I Darken. I’m pretty positive I will enjoy the remaining two books as well. I also like to deny myself things even more.

 

Smoke in the Sun by Renee Ahdieh

Screenshot_2019-08-29 Smoke in the Sun (Flame in the Mist, #2)

Smoke in the Sun is the sequel to Flame in the Mist and the concluding novel in the duology. I gave Flame in the Mist five stars, based more on enjoyment. But since then I’ve reconsidered some things, like the romance was not quite up to par with The Wrath & the Dawn and Renee could have gone a different route with it that would have done much better. Regardless, I still enjoyed it. That, and with there being only two books, it seems ridiculous not to finish what I started.

 

Our Dark Duet by Victoria Schwab

Screenshot_2019-08-29 Our Dark Duet (Monsters of Verity, #2)

I honestly have no idea why I have not read Our Dark Duet yet. It’s the concluding novel in the duology. This Savage Song was amazing. I like Victoria Schwab as an author. That is all I have to say for myself. I have no excuses.

 

What series on this have you finished (or not)?

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A Large TBR & a Small Haul: Books for My YA Literature Class

Remember how around this time last year, I was worried about how much I would be reading come graduate school? I won’t have to worry about that Fall 2019.

In my reference services class last fall, one area of library and information science we covered was reader’s advisory. As the name suggests, these librarians recommend books to patrons as well as select books for the library stacks, among other things. It was my favorite section of the whole course. When I mentioned to my advisor, who also happened to be the professor that taught the reference services class, that I was interested in reader’s advisory, she recommended I take the Collections and Materials Young Adult course.

The professor teaching the course (which is online) released the reading list for the course last week. If I am reading it right, for each section we will have to read at least two books a week: the required book and one out of the five or six others she recommended. Fortunately, I own a lot of them. Some are even on my TBR or I have already read. Even better, there are some on this list I’ve wanted to own for a while. Now, I finally had an excuse to buy them.

However, unfortunately, there are a lot of really good books on this list I am interested in. I’ve already gotten some of them from the library, and will likely get more

throughout the semester.

So, yeah, I don’t have to fret about not reading this semester.

 

The book haul

The Passion of Dolssa by Julie Berry was a book I had marked as “read” on Goodreads since summer of 2016. I got it out from the library back then. However, at the time I “read” this book, I was recovering from an unexpected health scare. I was in a lot of pain and the medication made me very sleepy. In other words, I’m not sure if I finished The Passion of Dolssa. While I do want to read it again, there are other books in the historical fiction section of the course that I want to reread. (The struggle is real for this class.)

The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo is a book I’ve heard so, so many good things about. I see it in the bookstores, along with Elizabeth Acevado’s sophomore novel, With the Fire on High, resisting the urge to buy them. Now, I finally had a reason to buy The Poet X. Even though I need to read it for school, I’m pretty positive I will still really love this book.

March: Book One by John Lewis and Andrew Aydin is the required read for the nonfiction section of the course. I’ve seen this graphic novel floating around, only I never paid much attention to it. All I know is it’s about the Civil Rights movement.

The 57 Bus by Dashka Slater is one of the recommended books from the nonfiction section. I bought it mostly because, of all the ones on the list, it was the only one I recognized. I mentioned before that I struggle with nonfiction sometimes. The 57 Bus, though, I think I might like. It is a true crime story about two teenagers, one being accused of committing a hate crime against the other.

Scythe by Neal Shusterman was a book I intended to get out of the library, due to my conflicted relationship with dystopian. However, with the finale of the trilogy coming out around the same time my class will get to this book (which is the required read for the final section of the course), I didn’t want to chance a possibly long library waitlist. Despite whatever apprehension I feel, Scythe will definitely be an intriguing book to study.

You Bring the Distant Near by Mitali Perkins is the required read for the historical fiction section of the course and another book I’ve wanted to get for myself. It has one of my favorite tropes: intergenerational family stories. It follows five women of the same family as they come to terms with their identities while also still holding onto their Indian culture.

 

TBR Books I Will Read for the Course (or might not, depending on my mood)

Dumplin’ by Julie Murphy is a book with a plus-size teen heroine that I have wanted to read for ages. When I saw it on the list for the recommended reads of the first section, I got really excited. Problem is, there are other books on the list I’ve already read that I want to reread from an academic perspective. I still might read Dumplin’, just because I want to.

Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds is one of the recommended reads for the same section as The Poet X. Jason Reynolds is an author so many people sing praises for. Long Way Down is told in verse during an elevator ride where a grief-stricken, angry teenaged boy on his way to commit murder encounters people from his life that have passed on.

Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi is one of the recommended reads for the final section. Though there is a reread on that list I think would be fascinating to study and other books that have peaked my interest, if I am being honest, I will likely pick Children of Blood and Bone. Mostly because it has been on my TBR for longer than it should and the sequel will be close to release by then.

 

Other Books on the List I’ve Already Read and will be (or not) Rereading

 The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon is the first required read of the class for the semester. Looking forward to finding out what my classmates have to say about this one.

The Impossible Knife of Memory by Laurie Halse Anderson was on the same list as Dumplin’ as part of the first section of books to read for the semester. Though Dumplin’ and Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli were also on this list, I’ve wanted to reread The Impossible Knife of Memory. Also, of these books, it would be the most intriguing to discuss in an academic setting, due to topics covered like PTSD and children living with mentally ill parents.

Salt to the Sea by Ruta Sepetys is the one I’m torn between for the historical fiction section. Like The Impossible Knife of Memory, I have wanted to reread Salt to the Sea and I think it would be a good book to study academically. However, I also want to read The Passion of Dolssa…I’m in such a predictament at the moment. Hell, I might end up reading both.

Heartless by Marissa Meyer is one I had no idea if I wanted to add to the “possibly reread” list. At first, I was not going to. Like two other books on the recommendations lists, Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda and Eliza and Her Monsters by Francesca Zappia, I initially thought it too early to reread. I only read them last year. On the flip side, I can’t deny the academic appeal. Fortunately, I have until the near end of the semester to make up my mind.

 

Other Books on the List I Want to Read

The Great American Whatever by Tim Federle is part of the same section as The Sun is Also a Star and The Impossible Knife of Memory. Though not one of the ones I bought, I could not help myself when I saw my local library had a copy. A closeted gay budding filmmaker struggles to come out of his shell following the tragic death of his sister. Then, he meets a guy that inspires him to take back the starring role of his own life.

Burn, Baby, Burn by Meg Medina doesn’t come up until the historical fiction section in a few months but a book I felt like I needed to read right this second or I might die. It is set in New York City during the terror that was Son of Sam while a teenaged girl is still trying to live her life in fear of getting shot with her new boyfriend. I don’t need to know anything else beyond that, honestly.

I, Claudia by Mary McCoy another book on the recommendations list for the first section of the course, I, Claudia was a book I had seen floating around but never paid attention to. When I saw it on the list, realized it followed a girl who never wanted power is suddenly thrusted into power, and my library had a copy, I felt more compelled to read it. And I already checked it out of my library.

 

The rest of these I have saved onto a list on my library account. A lot of them are part of later sections in the course. Like I said, this class offers a lot of great choices. I actually would not read them for school, if I ran out of time to use them for their respective sections.

#Not Your Princess: Voices of Native American Women by Lisa Charleyboy and Mary Beth Leatherdale

They Called Us Enemy by George Takei

The Crossover by Kwame Alexander

Girls Like Us by Gail Giles

I’m Just Me by M.G. Higgins

The Bitter Side of Sweet by Tara Sullivan

If I Ever Get Out of Here by Eric L. Gansworth

Landscape with Invisible Hand by M.T. Anderson

Far, Far Away by Tom McNeal

Frogkisser! By Garth Nix

 

Have you read any of these books?

Which ones do you think I should or should not read or reread?

Do I make library school sound fun?

Top 5 Tuesday: Six TBR Books I Do Not Talk (or Think) About Enough

There are a lot of books that I have read I don’t talk about, like Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell. However, over the last couple of weeks, I noticed there are many unread books on my shelves that I somehow seem to forget I have. Most, admittedly, I bought on impulse.

This week’s Top 5 Tuesday got me thinking about my reading goals for next year…but more on that in December. Right now, here are six (because one I felt I had to mention) randomly selected TBR books that I do not talk, or think, about enough.

 

The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks

Screenshot_2019-08-13 The Notebook (The Notebook, #1)

Yes, you read that right….

In hindsight, I’m not sure why I bought this tiny mass market paperback from Rite Aid back in 2015. The Notebook, in case you live under a rock, is a love story between a rich girl and a boy from the wrong side of the tracks who are separated by circumstances. Nicholas Sparks has had virtually every single one of his books made into a movie. That says something about his writing, right? Even though I’m trying hard to forget how he tried to stop his school from hosting a LGBT book club….(Google it)

 

The Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling

Screenshot_2019-08-13 The Casual Vacancy

I bought The Casual Vacancy during the same trip to Rite Aid as The Notebook. With this one, I know the main reason I have not picked it up was because of polarizing reviews. People said it was “boring” and “not as good as Harry Potter.” Now, having read her Cormoran Strike series, I know J.K. Rowling is a good writer regardless of genre. I’m still going into The Casual Vacancy with mediocre expectations, knowing that not everything can be compared to Harry Potter. Because Harry Potter is in a class all his own.

 

Love Story by Erich Segal

Screenshot_2019-08-13 Love Story (Love Story, #1)

In college, my friend took a romantic literature course and, when she couldn’t sell certain books back to the school bookstore, I offered to take them off her hands. Love Story by Erich Segal was one of them. It was interesting to me, similar to The Notebook only in a more modern setting with an ending not nearly as hopeful. What really pushed me to read this book was the movie Dark Shadows, as it is the book the two lovers of the film bond over.

 

The Madman’s Daughter trilogy by Megan Shepard

There is no excuse I can give as to why I have not read The Madman’s Daughter trilogy by Megan Shepard. Each is a retelling of classic Gothic literature: The Island of Dr. Moreau, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and Frankenstein. The protagonist, Juliet Moreau, is a genius in her own right struggling with her presumably inherited madness from her father.

In other words, why have I not read these books yet?

 

A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

Screenshot_2019-08-13 A Tale of Two Cities

Before someone asks: no, I did not buy A Tale of Two Cities because of the Infernal Devices trilogy. Over a year after completing my Bachelor’s in English literature, I felt compelled to read classics again. It was embarrassing to me how little I’ve actually read, since mainly the only time I read them was for school. A Tale of Two Cities, which follows a love triangle set during the French Resolution, seems like something I might enjoy. Not just because it was mentioned in the Infernal Devices trilogy.

 

My Cousin Rachel by Daphne Du Maurier

Screenshot_2019-08-13 My Cousin Rachel

My Cousin Rachel is the book I could not resist the urge to add this list. I read Daphne Du Maurier’s Rebecca when I started using my local library. I enjoyed it, though I have yet to buy my own copy. I bought My Cousin Rachel impulsively while having a bad day at Target. But it sounds a little more interesting than Rebecca, anyway.

Philip Ashley takes in Rachel, the widow of his recently deceased favorite cousin, but rumors surrounding his cousin’s death make him suspicious of her. As he searches for answers, Philip cannot deny his attraction to Rachel. Except he can’t figure out if she’s a conniving murderess or a victim of circumstance. If Daphne Du Maurier is the writer I think she is, it’s both.

 

What books on your TBR do you forget you have? 

Top 5 Tuesday: Top 5 Backlist Dystopian Novels on My To Be Read Pile

I read dystopia back when dystopian novels were a thing. I liked the genre and I didn’t. I loved The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood and The Hunger Games trilogy by Suzanne Collins. I overall enjoyed The Darkest Minds trilogy by Alexandra Bracken, though in the end I was left disappointed. And I’m not going to waste more time by discussing the Divergent trilogy.

eric fanning discussion GIF

Despite my on-again, off-again relationship with dystopian, lately, it has been drawing me back in. I’m drawn to dystopia with more adult themes. There are books that came out back in the day that I never got around to reading for one reason or another. I would likely still read them now when I need something light and entertaining to hold me over during a slump.

Of the series on this list, I own two of them. The other I plan to check out from the library or buy my own copies, whichever comes first. Most of you have probably already read these books, so you can let me know if they are good or not.

Those backlist dystopian series are:

 

Matched trilogy by Ally Condie

Screenshot_2019-08-13 Matched (Matched, #1)

From what I remember, the Matched trilogy is set in a world where everyone is assigned a romantic partner based on science and the government controls what poetry or artwork people can look at. If I’m being honest, it was the latter that made me want to read this series more than the former. I also remember someone mentioning that the main character’s inner rebellion begins when her grandfather recites a forbidden poem on his deathbed. I also heard this series goes downhill after book two, but that is the case with most young adult dystopian.

 

Legend trilogy by Marie Liu

Screenshot_2019-08-13 Legend (Legend, #1)

I’m not sure why I never read the Legend trilogy when it first came out. The best (worst) explanation I can offer is that the trilogy came out during a time where I didn’t have my own income to buy books, relying mostly on gift cards. I had to be selective with what I bought. Then again, I didn’t seem to think to use the library, either. Somehow, the Legend books fell to the wayside, even though I was drawn to the idea of a criminal and a socialite teaming up to take down the government.

 

Delirium trilogy by Lauren Oliver

Screenshot_2019-08-13 Delirium (Delirium, #1)

Thinking about it now, I’m almost positive I had no interest in reading Delirium during the height of its popularity. At the time, it seemed too romance-heavy for my liking. In recent months, though, I have been drawn more and more to Lauren Oliver’s books. I also heard that the Delirium trilogy has an interesting ending regarding the love triangle of the series, which had me more intrigued.

 

Shatter Me series by Tahereh Mafi

Screenshot_2019-08-13 Shatter Me (Shatter Me, #1)

I checked the Shatter Me series out from the library to read for two reasons. First, I wanted to see what all the fuss was about, especially once Restore Me came out. Second, because I felt like I should read the author’s original work before picking up her contemporary, A Very Large Expanse of Sea. As you can guess, I did not read the series. I wanted to check them out from the library again, since I’ve heard less than ideal things about the writing and plot. But, I have to admit, those new covers are super pretty….

 

Forget Tomorrow trilogy by Pintip Dunn

Screenshot_2019-08-13 Forget Tomorrow (Forget Tomorrow, #1)

I first heard of Forget Tomorrow on Benjamin of Tomes YouTube channel a few years ago and that was the only place I saw or heard of it again. It is set in a world where, on your seventeenth birthday, you are given a vision from your future self. The main character, Callie, receives a vision of her murdering her younger sister and is then arrested. The rest of the trilogy is her trying to figure out why and if she can change her future before becoming the criminal everyone thinks she already is. I really hope these books are as good as they sound.

 

Which of these dystopian series have you read?

 

Round Two of Summer 2019 Book Haul

Fun fact about library school: part-time jobs and internships are hard to come by.

While the field is expanding, it is also super competitive. I learned that the hard way this past spring, when my once shiny resume lost its sheen. Then, when I got this temp job for the summer, I threw myself headfirst into the work, not bothering to take any sort of break until now.

To be honest, at first I was looking forward to the end of this assignment and taking a much-needed break. Then, we started a new project two weeks before my contract was supposed to end. My overwhelming need to be helpful, combined with the panic I felt after being turned down for a paid internship I applied for, I offered to stay longer until said project is completed.

Under the terms and conditions regarding temps, I can only stay as a “light” worker, which means working no more than fourteen hours a week. With a new semester a few weeks away, this works out well in my favor. Best part, I still have easy access to great bookstores.

Well, great for me. Not so sure about my wallet.

Since the last round of my summer book haul, I’ve bought fourteen books. And, I must admit, I’m running out of steam—and space. Like I said, these bookstores are awesome. My wish list is huge, and only getting bigger. Deciding what to buy next has become a problem. This will likely be the last round of my summer book haul. I don’t know when the next one will be either. Especially since I’m taking a week off at my new boss’s insistence, I have the itch to utilize my local library again.

We will see how long that lasts. Take your bets now.

In the past few weeks, I bought:

 

We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson

wehavealwayslivedinthecastle

I know everyone and their mother was obsessed with Netflix’s adaption of Shirley Jackson’s novel The Haunting of Hill House when it came out. I have read her short story The Lottery, only it’s not my favorite. Of all her works, We Have Always Lived in the Castle was the one I was most intrigued by. From my knowledge, it is about two odd sisters living with their odd uncle in the family’s mansion and the younger sister is accused of killing the rest of the other members of the family.

 

A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith

atreegrowsinbrooklyn

A good friend, one who does not read a lot, told me she loved A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. All I knew about it was that it was one of those “modern classics.” Admittedly, I bought it after seeing it on the “top 100” something books on Goodreads. I do want to read more classics, though.

 

I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith

icapturethecastle

Another modern classic, I Capture the Castle is set in 1934 and told through the diary entries of seventeen-year-old Cassandra. She lives with her eccentric family in their dilapidated castle. It takes place over the course of six months, covering major changes within the family, including Cassandra’s first love. I only expect great things from a book J.K. Rowling blurbed.

 

Fierce Fairytales by Nikita Gill

fiercefairytales

Fierce Fairytales is a book I had my eye on for a while. I was further enticed to pick it up after reading snippets of Nikita Gill’s writing in The Mermaid’s Voice Returns in This One by Amanda Lovelace. You can imagine my surprise and delight when I found it randomly at Target, while looking for another book.

 

Kingsbane by Claire Legrand

kingsbane

Kingsbane is the sequel to Furyborn, which I have not read yet. So, naturally, I don’t know anything, since it’s a second book.

 

Shadow & Flame by Mindee Arnett

shadow&flame

Shadow & Flame is another sequel, this one to Onyx & Ivory. I don’t know much about this one, either, besides the first book not getting the best reviews.

 

Aurora Rising by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff

aurorarising

I read Aurora Rising from the library a couple of months ago. I had to get my own copy because I liked it so much. I actually have this book facing front on my bookshelves.

 

A Darker Shade of Magic

A Gathering of Shadows

A Conjuring of Light

by V.E. Schwab

After reading Vicious and Vengeful this year, I asked myself why I was waiting on the Shades of Magic trilogy. It is like one of V.E./Victoria Schwab’s most popular works, after Vicious. When Barnes & Noble had an online sale, I bought the boxed set.

 

The Merciless II: The Exorcism of Sofia Flores

The Merciless III: Origins of Evil

The Merciless IV: Last Rites

By Danielle Vega

I bought The Merciless by Danielle Vega a few years ago, during a phase of love for young adult horror. It’s about teenaged girls performing an exorcism on a classmate they think is possessed. Three more books came out of it. I’m not sure if I made the right choice buying all the books before having read the first book. We will find out.

 

13 Ways of Looking at a Fat Girl by Mona Awad

13waysoflookingatafatgirl

This book practically shouted my name from the display table at the bookstore. It is a collection of short stories following a plus size woman as she works through body issues and deals with not-so-helpful advice from loved ones. It’s all about coming into her own and embracing herself, and her body, for what it is.

 

Have you read any of these books? What did you think of them?

Round One of Summer 2019 Book Haul

I said I was going to cut back on the book-buying this summer.

I say a lot of things.

Turns out, the issue of the student health insurance worked out (yay for student loans!). Which means, I have more money now for new clothes, textbooks…and, you know, books. Still, this job is only going at least until August. So, every paycheck, I put money into my savings account. Whether or not I have anything left for books after that is a bonus.

I’m calling this book haul “round one” for two reasons. First, I know I’m going to buy more books later. It’s a guarantee I accepted. Second is, if I wait until the end of summer break to post a haul, I’m not going to have a lot of time to write about all the books I bought.

In hindsight, buying ten books over a course of two and a half months is actually not a bad thing. Given that, in the past, that would be the amount I’d buy in a single trip to the bookstore….A sign I am on my way to becoming a full-fledged adult. (Now all I need is to move out of my dad’s house….)

Between May and the first two weeks of July, I bought:

 

The Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon

theprioryoftheorangetree

Samantha Shannon’s The Bone Season is on my Goodreads, yet so low on my radar I forget it’s there. The Priory of the Orange Tree immediately got my attention, though. I don’t know much about it, other than it’s about two warring kingdoms ruled by queens and there are dragons. And I bought this book online from Barnes & Noble—you better believe I wasn’t lugging this behemoth on my arm, on a bus or a train.

 

Black Leopard, Red Wolf by Marlon James

blackleopardredwolf

Black Leopard, Red Wolf is advertised as an “African Game of Thrones.” Despite not being a GOT fan, the idea behind this novel did intrigue me. Plus, the cover always caught my attention whenever I was in a bookstore. It’s gorgeous and, of course, expensive. Even on Amazon. Thankfully, a sale at Barnes & Noble came to my rescue.

 

Ghosts of the Shadow Market by Cassandra Clare, Sarah Rees Brennan, Maureen Johnson, Kelly Link, and Robin Wasserman

ghostsoftheshadowmarket

The latest of Cassandra Clare’s Shadowhunter Chronicles novella bind-ups, it is low on my priority list at the moment. If I don’t read Ghosts of the Shadow Market before the end of 2019, I have no problem leaving it for my Chain of Gold hangover cure. I did not love Tales from the Shadowhunter Academy and I keep forgetting The Bane Chronicles exists. Ghosts of the Shadow Market is allegedly best read before Queen of Air and Darkness, as it explains certain things that happened. But the two new novellas also include spoilers, so I think I better not.

 

Teeth in the Mist by Dawn Kurtagich

teethinthemist

One of my most anticipated releases of the year, Teeth in the Mist is a young adult horror novel following three girls in three time periods. I want to know as little as possible before I read this book. If it is anything like Dawn Kurtagich’s previous works, I expect a dark fantasy storyline, an unsettling atmosphere, and a twisty plot.

 

Sorcery of Thorns by Margaret Rogerson

sorceryofthorns

Another of my anticipated releases of the year, Sorcery of Thorns follows a young librarian, Elizabeth, charged with protecting magical books inside a library. When the demons contained in the books get out, she is held responsible and must turn to her mortal enemy, a sorcerer named Nathaniel, along with his demonic sidekick to clear her name. Even though I have not read Margaret Rogerson’s debut novel, An Enchantment of Ravens, I have a feeling I will like her books. And the covers are gorgeous.

 

The Bad-Ass Librarians of Timbuktu by Joshua Hammer

librariansoftimbuktu

I found The Bad-Ass Librarians of Timbuktu while browsing one of the bookstores near my work. It took me a couple of trips, but eventually I cracked. The Bad-Ass Librarians of Timbuktu is set in Africa when the Al Qaeda invaded in the 1980s. To protect the country’s valuable documents, librarians smuggled them out to safety to preserve their homeland’s history.

 

Anne Frank’s Diary graphic novel adaption by Ari Feldman and illustrated by David Polonsky

annefrankgraphicnovel

After reading the graphic novel adaptions of Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson and The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood, classic or popular novels adapted into graphic novels have become my new favorite thing. I read the original Anne Frank’s Diary, or at least excerpts of it, in middle school. I’ve wanted to reread it for years, though.

 

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee and illustrated by Fred Fordham

tokillamockingbirdgraphicnovel

I love To Kill a Mockingbird. The cover and a flip through of the book showed some gorgeous artwork. I want to read this book right now. I might, hopefully, at the end of the year when I’m looking for lighter reading material.

 

Sabrina by Nick Drnaso

sabrina

I can’t begin to describe the synopsis of Sabrina. It’s a mystery graphic novel revolved a missing woman in a futuristic modern society where technology has taken over. Or that’s my interpretation of it anyway. I’m starting to wonder if Sabrina is a book I’m better off not knowing anything about it before reading.

 

Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett

goodomens

Good Omens is an adult urban fantasy where an angel and a demon are charged with finding the misplaced Antichrist before apocalypse happens. I bought this book because I enjoyed the show. This is the second Neil Gaiman book I own; the first being American Gods (which I have not read). But after watching the Amazon Prime adaption of Good Omens and reading The Sleeper and the Spindle from the library earlier this year, his books are slowly working their way higher up on my TBR pile.

 

What books have you bought because of their TV show or movie adaptions?

The Anticipated Releases Book Tag!

I was tagged by Rebecca to do the Anticipated Releases Book Tag. So thank you!

To be honest: sometimes, I don’t pay too much attention to new releases unless it’s a book I’m very, very excited for, such as the next installment in a favorite series. More often than not, I forget when books come out until I see them available on Amazon or at the bookstore and library. I try to focus on the books that are currently released and in my possession or I have access to before I think about the ones not out yet. Somehow, though, I came up with enough answers for this tag.

 

Your most anticipated release of the year

Screenshot_2019-06-23 Capturing the Devil (Stalking Jack the Ripper, #4)

Capturing the Devil by Kerri Maniscalco, the final novel in the Stalking Jack the Ripper series. I am deliberately putting off reading Escaping from Houdini so I can marathon finish the series.

 

A book you’re not anticipating

Screenshot_2019-06-23 Wayward Son

This might hurt some of you, but Wayward Son by Rainbow Rowell. Wayward Son is the sequel to Carry On. While I’ve enjoyed most of Rainbow Rowell’s books, sadly, I did not love Carry On like so many other people have. Chances are, I won’t read Wayward Son.

 

Most underhyped anticipated release

lovelywar

Lovely War by Julie Berry, which I already own since Barnes and Noble had an amazing sale recently. I have read two of Julie Berry’s novels and I immensely enjoyed both of them. Even if I had not read any of the author’s previous works, I would have been drawn to it anyway. It is a fantasy historical fiction novel told through the eyes of Aphrodite, the Goddess of Love, as she tells the story of doomed lovers to Ares and Hephaestus in a Manhattan hotel room.

 

A book you’ve been waiting on forever

lethalwhite

Though it is technically not a new release at this point—it came out summer of last year—a book I waited for what felt like forever for was Lethal White by Robert Galbraith/JK Rowling. It is the fourth book in the Cormoran Strike series and the one that got pushed aside in favor of the disaster that was the Crimes of Grindelwald. As far as I am concerned, JK Rowling needs to retire her Boy Wizard and focus on her adorable, grumpy London private investigator.

 

A book you’re anticipating that’s out of your comfort zone

Screenshot_2019-06-23 Starsight cover image

That would be Starsight, the sequel to Skyward by Brandon Sanderson. I picked up Skyward last year because I’ve been wanting to get into Brandon Sanderson’s books for years and I wanted to read more Sci-fi. It’s not something I often reach for, compared to other genres.

 

Your top 3 “Can’t Wait” Books of the Year

Teeth in the Mist by Dawn Kurtagich

Sorcery of Thorns by Margaret Rogerson

A Curse so Dark and Lonely by Brigid Kemmerer

Technically, all three of these books are out by now, but they were all ones I was anticipating when I first heard of their publication. Contradicting my previous statement that I don’t pay too much attention to new releases unless it is by authors I’ve read previously, that is partially true.

Teeth in the Mist is Dawn Kurtagich’s third novel, and I read, and enjoyed, the other two. I bought Margaret Rogerson’s debut novel An Enchantment of Ravens when it came out, though I haven’t read it yet. But if a synopsis has any mention of libraries, magic, and sorcerers, like Sorcery of Thorns does, I am all for it. And I’m trash for Beauty and the Beast, so you bet your bottom dollar A Curse so Dark and Lonely, which came out way back in January, is on the list.

 

Top 5 most anticipated backlist books on your TBR

 

 

Truly Devious by Maureen Johnson

The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue by Mackenzi Lee

An Enchantment of Ravens by Margaret Rogerson

My Plain Jane by Cynthia Hand, Brodi Ashton, and Jodi Meadows

Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi

I came to a slightly uncomfortable revelation about myself this year: I want all the books yet I continuously deny myself what I actually want to read. All of these books should have been read by now, among so many others. Yet I keep putting them unfairly on the backburner. No idea why. I guess I am a masochist.

 

What is a backlist book you keep putting off “for the right moment?”

(TAG! You’re it!)

TBR Alphabet Tag

I don’t know what it is about book tags, but I see a whole bunch I want to do, I write up a draft almost immediately in a notebook, and then it takes me ages to type it up, edit, and post it on the blogsphere. I don’t get it.

Oh well. I saw this tag on Kristin’s blog a little while ago. Here it is now: the TBR Alphabet Tag.

 

A

An Assassin’s Guide to Love and Treason by Virginia Boecker

Screenshot_2019-06-16 An Assassin's Guide to Love and Treason

 

B

Beyond a Darkened Shore by Jessica Leake

Screenshot_2019-06-16 Beyond a Darkened Shore

 

C

Crimson Bound by Rosamund Hodge

Screenshot_2019-06-16 Crimson Bound

 

D

(The) Darkest Legacy by Alexandra Bracken

Screenshot_2019-06-16 The Darkest Legacy (The Darkest Minds, #4)

 

E

Empress of All Seasons by Emiko Jean

Screenshot_2019-06-16 Empress of All Seasons

 

F

Far From the Tree by Robin Benway

Screenshot_2019-06-16 Far from the Tree

 

G

Geekerella by Ashley Poston

Screenshot_2019-06-16 Geekerella (Once Upon a Con, #1)

 

H

Heretics Anonymous by Katie Henry

Screenshot_2019-06-16 Heretics Anonymous

 

I

Isle of Blood and Stone by Makiia Lucier

Screenshot_2019-06-16 Isle of Blood and Stone (Tower of Winds, #1)

 

J

None

 

K

Kindred by Octavia Butler

Screenshot_2019-06-16 Kindred

 

L

Little and Lion by Brandy Colbert

Screenshot_2019-06-16 Little Lion

 

M

My Name is Venus Black by Heather Lloyd

Screenshot_2019-06-16 My Name Is Venus Black

 

N

Northwest Angle by William Kent Krueger

Screenshot_2019-06-16 Northwest Angle (Cork O'Connor, #11)

 

O

Out of the Easy by Ruta Sepetys

Screenshot_2019-06-16 Out of the Easy

 

P

Providence by Caroline Kepnes

Screenshot_2019-06-16 Providence

 

Q: (The) Queen’s Rising by Rebecca Ross

Screenshot_2019-06-16 The Queen's Rising (The Queen’s Rising, #1)

 

R

Ruined by Amy Tintera

Screenshot_2019-06-16 Ruined (Ruined, #1)

 

S: Spindle Fire by Lexa Hillyer

Screenshot_2019-06-16 Spindle Fire (Spindle Fire #1)

 

T

Truly Devious by Maureen Johnson

Screenshot_2019-06-16 Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1)

 

U

Under Rose-Tainted Skies by Louise Gornall

Screenshot_2019-06-16 Under Rose-Tainted Skies

 

V

(The) Virgin’s Lover by Philippa Gregory

Screenshot_2019-06-16 The Virgin's Lover (The Plantagenet and Tudor Novels, #13)

 

 

W

Words in Deep Blue by Cath Crawley

Screenshot_2019-06-16 Words in Deep Blue

 

X

None

 

Y

You’re Welcome, Universe by Whitney Gardner

Screenshot_2019-06-16 You're Welcome, Universe

 

Z

None

 

I tag:

Shanah

Grey

Rebecca

Crystal

Sophie

Top 5 Tuesday: 11 Debut Novels I Want to Buy (Eventually)

One of the things I love about Shanah’s Top 5 Tuesday topics is that she leaves them open to interpretation. With “Top 5 Debut Novels,” I could not keep it at five. There are a lot of books coming out this summer, or are already out, that I have my eye on. Worse still, my new top is smack in between two bookstores. But the promise of textbooks on the horizon and empty hangers asking for new clothes in my closet have me trying to refrain from going overboard with every paycheck.

Key word trying.

            Here are the eleven debut novels I am most excited to add to my bookshelves (or check out from the library, whichever comes for):

 

Again, but Better by Christine Riccio

Screenshot_2019-06-02 Again, but Better(1)

I’ve been following Christine’s writing vlogs since she started her novel project in 2016. Besides liking Christine and her videos, I’m drawn to this book anyway. The cover is super pretty and it’s about a shy bookworm that studies abroad in London in hopes of getting out of her shell to improve her college experience.

 

Wilder Girls by Rory Power

Screenshot_2019-06-02 Wilder Girls

An all-girls boarding school on an island is quarantined after a virus infects and kills the teachers then leaves the students horribly mutilated. The girls are left to fend for themselves on the island to wait for a cure and never go beyond the walls of the school. But when one goes missing, another girl dares to venture into the world outside to find her. In doing so, she uncovers more to the story than what she and her friends knew.

 

We Hunt the Flame by Hafsah Faizal

Screenshot_2019-06-02 We Hunt the Flame (Sands of Arawiya, #1)

A girl disguises herself as a man to hunt in a cursed forest to feed her village and a prince assassinates those who dare to challenge his father the sultan. They are two heroes that don’t want to be heroes. Now one has to hunt the other as they are both in search of an ancient artifact that can save their kingdom from war.

 

Nocturna by Maya Motayne

Screenshot_2019-06-02 Nocturna (A Forgery of Magic, #1)

Finn is a skilled thief and shapeshifter that can disguise her face as anyone she wants. She’s blackmailed by a mobster to steal something from the royal palace, which causes her to cross paths with Prince Alfie. Grief-stricken by the murder of his older brother, Alfie feels he can never live up to his brother’s legacy and seeks forbidden magic to bring him back from the dead. But when he meets the shapeshifting thief, an evil force is accidentally unleashed. Aside from having a gorgeous cover, Nocturna is also based in Dominican mythology, something I am very interested in reading.

 

The Tiger at Midnight by Swati Teerdhala

Screenshot_2019-06-02 The Tiger at Midnight (The Tiger at Midnight Trilogy, #1)

Having just watched the live-action Aladdin, I’m craving more desert fantasy. Based on Indian and Hindu mythology, The Tiger at Midnight follows a rebel called the Viper and a soldier who are forced into a power play as the Viper seeks revenge for those who took everything from her. Both think they’re calling the shots, but they are only pawns in a larger, deadly game.

 

Spin the Dawn by Elizabeth Lim

Screenshot_2019-06-02 Spin the Dawn (The Blood of Stars, #1)

Spin the Dawn was a book I heard about on Hailey in Bookland’s most anticipated books of 2019 then forgot it until I made this list. A girl disguises herself as a boy to join a competition to become the emperor’s royal tailor to provide for her family. Then, she is presented the challenge of creating three dresses for the emperor’s betrothed—from the laughter of the sun, the tears of the moon, and the blood of the stars—and travels to the depths of the kingdom, finding more than she anticipated.

 

Kings, Queens, and In-Betweens by Tanya Boteju

Screenshot_2019-06-02 Kings, Queens, and In-Betweens

Kings, Queens, and In-Betweens follows a bored, awkward queer teen named Nima who is in love with her straight friend and still reeling from her mom’s sudden departure. After an encounter at a festival, she is drawn into the drag scene where she not only learns how to love and accept it and herself, but also how to accept when love is lost. Plus, this cover is so freaking pretty.

 

How it Feels to Float by Helena Fox

Screenshot_2019-06-02 How It Feels to Float

Biz lost her dad when she was seven, although everyone but her thinks that. She doesn’t tell anyone she can still see him, or about her chaotic thought patterns, or how she kissed her friend Grace or noticed the new boy Jasper. Then, something happens to Biz one day at the beach and the strings that held her together for so long finally give way at the seams. The ghost of her dad disappears, leaving her to wonder if it might be easier to either disappear altogether or find her dad and bring him back to her. But there is a third option Biz has yet to find.

 

The Beholder by Anna Bright

Screenshot_2019-06-02 The Beholder

Selah is a princess that has waited her whole life to embrace her duty to marry for her kingdom and find happily ever after. But after a humiliating public rejection, she goes along with her stepmother’s plan of travelling the seas from country to country to find a husband. If she doesn’t come back engaged, she doesn’t come home at all. But while Selah embarks on the journey of a lifetime, she finds more than her stepmother’s schemes hiding belowdecks.

 

This is Not a Love Scene by S.C. Megale

Screenshot_2019-06-02 This Is Not a Love Scene

Aspiring filmmaker Maeve has a rare form of muscular dystrophy and is wheelchair-bound. Her friends and passion for what she does distracts her from constant rejection from the opposite sex. Then, she meets Cole Stone, a hot older guy starring in her senior film project that is giving her looks she’s never gotten before. With this new attention and unexpected confidence, Maeve gets a taste of teenaged dating life, both physically and emotionally. But when it comes to choosing between what she needs and what she wants, and getting an answer out of Cole, suddenly romance doesn’t look so fun anymore.

 

The Art of Breaking Things by Laura Sibson

Screenshot_2019-06-02 The Art of Breaking Things

Skye is enjoying her time partying with friends and counting down to graduation and art school until her mom rekindles a romance with the man who betrayed Skye’s trust years ago. Too young to understand what happened to her, she kept quiet. Torn between running away and staying to protect her younger sister, she must find the courage to reveal the secret she’s hidden for so long. With the help of her friends and her artwork, Skye becomes her best ally and finds her words.

 

What is your most anticipated debut of the summer or of 2019 overall?

 

           

I Should Have Read That Book Tag

Like any bookworm, I have a large to be read pile that keeps growing. Not that I mind—I accept it at this point. Still, there are books sitting on my shelves unread, for longer than they probably should be. All for different reasons that I will try not to get into over and over again. You all just want to see the books, right?

I saw this book tag on Crystal’s blog.

 

A book that a friend is always telling you to read.

gemmadoyle18

I don’t have a lot of friends who are readers. But one who is a reader has frequently recommended the Gemma Doyle trilogy by Libba Bray. I have wanted to read this series for years anyway.

 

A book that’s been on your TBR forever, yet you still haven’t picked it up.

crimsonboundmar18

Crimson Bound by Rosamund Hodge, which is a fantastical retelling of Little Red Riding. I loved her debut novel, Cruel Beauty, a retelling of Beauty and the Beast blended with Greek mythology. I want to get back into Rosamund Hodge’s books.

 

A book in a series you started, but haven’t gotten around to finishing yet.

myplainjane

My Plain Jane by Cynthia Hand, Brodi Ashton, and Jodi Meadows. It’s the second in a series of companion novels about famous characters named Jane from history, in which the familiar stories are turned on their heads with a humorous fantasy twist. My Plain Jane is a retelling of Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte.

 

A classic you’ve always liked the sound of, but never actually read.

wutheringheights

For one year of summer reading in high school, I was supposed to read Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte. Only I read enough of it to fill out the worksheet. Now I’m an older and wiser reader, fully embracing my hopeless romantic side, I want to reread Wuthering Heights from start to finish.

 

A popular book it seems everyone but you has read.

thehateugive

The Hate U Give is a book I swear everyone and their mother has read and loved.

 

A book that inspired a film/TV adaption that you love, but just haven’t read yet.

Animated GIF

I had no idea the Hellboy movies were based off comic books until I actually looked it up. I love the 2004 film directed by Guillermo del Toro with Ron Perlman as Hellboy and Selma Blair as Liz Sherman, as well as the sequel, Hellboy 2: The Golden Army. To this day, I have not read the comic books nor do I really have any desire to do so.

 

A book you see all over Instagram but haven’t picked up.

I see a lot of books on Instagram that I have not gotten to yet. I swear it changes almost daily. Six of Crows duology by Leigh Bardugo…The Cruel Prince by Holly Black….The list goes on.

 

I tag:

Rebecca

Grey

Kristin

Sophie

 

What books have been sitting on your TBR for too long?